Day 1 tennis program with Emma Raducanu and Andy Murray on center court

The top contenders prepare for the Wimbledon Championships

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  • How football and Formula 1 are winning over American fans
    How football and Formula 1 are winning over American fans
    The landscape for sports fans is wider than ever, both because there are more ways to watch, thanks to streaming options, and because there are more sports available to watch. But while some sports are doing well in this landscape, others are struggling to adapt to the same sports that have long been mainstays of American culture. For young sports fans, their sporting interests may be very different from those of older fans. Sports like soccer, esports, and Formula 1 racing have seen tremendous growth in the United States, thanks in large part to interest from Millennials and Gen Z. As the internet, news technologies and globalization are bringing the world closer together, more and more Americans are becoming fans. international sports. Roxane Coche is a communications professor at the University of Florida who has studied both sides of the international sports divide, both in her native France and in the United States. “We’re getting to a point where, like, this generation has grown up with the ability to speak their mind and be who they really are, maybe more than any other generation before,” Coche said. “And so I think that and also the ability to have access to niche environments, niche sports in this case, but niche anything through the power of the internet.” Let’s start with the huge jump in American fandom for Formula 1 racing. The international motor racing series has found hundreds of millions of fans around the world, and despite decades of efforts to hold races in the United States- United, it couldn’t compete with the attention in the states that American racing series like NASCAR or Indy Car got. But F1 took a different approach, creating “Formula One: Drive to Survive”, a behind-the-scenes documentary series released on Netflix that follows every driver and staff from every racing team. Now it is a smash hit among American fans. The inaugural Miami Grand Prix held in May sold out a capacity of 240,000 fans over its three days in the Sunshine State, and polls of the recent rise in F1 fandom link it to the Netflix series. A Morning Consult poll released in March found that more than a third of fans aged 18-34 in the United States became fans last year, and that more than half of all F1 fans said that the Netflix series was a reason for their fandom. To some degree, the success of a behind-the-scenes docu-drama in sparking new interest in a sport shouldn’t come as a surprise. Ohio State economics professor Trevon Logan, who has done years of research on sports economics, explained why. “A lot of what we’re consuming here is really about these stories that have kinds of mythologies attached to them,” Logan said. “So you have these big, big stories, and then on an individual level, you need these compelling stories about people.” It is also accessible. The documentary series is available on Netflix, while the races air on ESPN and their streaming services. Other established leagues have also dabbled in streaming their games. MLB is experimenting with new broadcast techniques in streaming games on Apple TV this season, including weaving in more live stats, and NFL fans might be a little surprised when they try to find Thursday games. evening this year. They’ll be on Amazon Prime for the next decade and more. As more people cut the cord and don’t rely on cable, the leagues may need to find other sources of money and other places for fans to watch, according to the professor and professor at Southern Utah University. David Berri, sports economics expert. “They’re going where the audience is going, so if audiences are moving away from traditional cable or traditional networks and they’re going to streaming services, then the leagues are going to follow where that audience is going,” Berri said. “The great thing about sports is that it’s different from a TV program in that you have to watch a sporting event live for it to mean something to you.” But while F1 has seen strong growth, the sport that has arguably been the biggest jump into the American mainstream has been the one the rest of the world loves the most: soccer. Accessibility also played a role here, as American channels paid for broadcast rights to events such as the World Cup and European soccer leagues. and put them on TV and streaming platforms. The game known internationally as soccer has long struggled to gain traction in the United States, but surveys show it is now the fourth most popular sport in the United States after overtaking hockey. Fan analysis from football marketing firm Gilt Edge found that nearly 70% of football fans in the United States are under 40, and that’s certainly a more diverse crowd, as immigrants or children of immigrants from soccer-crazed countries bring their love for the game to the United States “I started to see a lot of intersections with the history of immigration, with a lot of my own upbringing as the son of a Mexican immigrants and a deep love for sport and Mexico and

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  • "It was reassuring" Serena happy to be back after doubles win at Eastbourne
    ‘It was reassuring’ Serena happy to be back after doubles win at Eastbourne
    ‘It was reassuring’ Serena happy to be back after doubles win at Eastbourne

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  • Sajid Javid announces partnership between UK government and Moderna
    Sajid Javid announces partnership between UK government and Moderna
    Health Secretary Sajid Javid has said the government’s partnership with vaccine maker Moderna will bring more than £1 billion of investment in mRNA research to the UK.

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One of the highlights of the UK sporting calendar is upon us as Wimbledon is back to start the summer off right.

As always, there are plenty of stories to watch, whether Rafael Nadal continue her bid for a schedule slam, Iga Swiatek’s relentless dominance atop the women’s game, or Andy Murray and Emma Raducanu hoping to put injury problems behind them at home.

Seeded and defending champion Novak Djokovic kicks off the proceedings on center court on Monday, before Raducanu and Murray also feature on the most famous tennis court.

Elsewhere on matchday one, Cameron Norrie kicks off his campaign while Ryan Peniston, who received a wildcard in the main draw after his strong season on grass, takes on Henri Laaksonen. Jodie Burrage and Heather Watson are among the other British hopefuls in action.

Here’s Monday’s order of play in full…

Wibledon Schedule | Order of play for Monday, June 27, 2022

All times are BST, from 11am, unless otherwise stated. Seeds in brackets.

Center Court (from 1.30 p.m.)

  • Novak Djokovic (1) against Kwon Soon Woo
  • Alison Van Uytvanck vs. Emma Raducanu (10)
  • Andy Murray vs. James Duckworth

Court 1 (from 1 p.m.)

  • Mirjam Bjorklund vs Ons Jabeur (3)
  • Jan-Lennard Struff vs. Carlos Alcaraz (5)
  • Angelique Kerber (15) against Kristina Mladenovic

Court 2

  • Cameron Norrie (9) vs. Pablo Andujar
  • Bernarda Pera vs. Anett Kontaveit (2)
  • Jannik Sinner (10) vs. Stan Wawrinka
  • Maria Sakkari (5) vs. Zoe Hives



Cameron Norrie is yet to make it past the third round of a Grand Slam (Getty Images)


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Cameron Norrie is yet to make it past the third round of a Grand Slam (Getty Images)

Court 3

  • Alejandro Davidovitch Fokina against Hubert Hurkacz (7)
  • Danielle Collins (7) vs. Marie Bouzkova
  • Tamara Korpatsch vs. Heather Watson
  • Ryan Peniston vs Henri Laaksonen

Court 12

  • Casper Ruud (3) against Albert Ramos-Vinolas
  • Kaja Juvan vs. Beatriz Haddad Maia (23)
  • Belindia Bencic (14) against Qiang Wang
  • Steve Johnson vs. Grigor Dimitrov (18)

Court 18

  • Jodie Burrage vs. Lesia Tsurenko
  • Enzo Couacaud against John Isner (20)
  • Jay Clarke vs. Chris Harrison
  • Marta Kostyuk vs. Katie Swan (Not before 5 p.m.)



Jodie Burrage beat world number four Paula Badosa in Eastbourne (Getty Images for LTA)


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Jodie Burrage beat world number four Paula Badosa in Eastbourne (Getty Images for LTA)

Court 4

  • Tommy Paul (30) against Fernando Verdasco
  • Camila Osorio vs. Elise Mertens (24)
  • Martina Trevisan (22) against Elisabetta Cocciaretto
  • Carlos Taberner vs. Reilly Opelka (15)

Court 6

  • Tomas Etcheverry vs. Ugo Humbert
  • Clara Tauson vs. Mai Hontama
  • Tamara Zidansek vs. Panna Udvardy
  • Taro Daniel vs. Sebastian Baez (31)

Court 7

  • Anhelina Kalinina (29) against Anna Bondar
  • Alejandro Tabilo against Laslo Djéré
  • Oscar Otte (32) against Peter Gojowczyk



Oscar Otte was beaten by Andy Murray in the second round of Wimbledon last year (AFP via Getty Images)


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Oscar Otte was beaten by Andy Murray in the second round of Wimbledon last year (AFP via Getty Images)

Court 8

  • Maximilien Marterer vs Aliaz Bedene
  • Aleksandra Krunic vs. Sorana Cirstea (26)
  • Daniel Altmaier vs Mikael Ymer
  • Daria Saville vs. Viktoriya Tomova

Court 9

  • Benoit Paire vs Quentin Halys
  • Federico Coria vs. Jiri Vesely
  • Lucia Bronzetti vs. Ann Li
  • Yanina Wickmayer vs. Lin Zhu

Yard 10

  • Ylena In-Albon vs. Alison Riske (28)
  • Rebecca Marino vs. Katarzyna Kawa
  • Maddison Inglis vs. Dalma Galfi
  • Alexander Bublik vs. Marton Fucsovics

Court 11

  • Thiago Monteiro vs Jaume Munar
  • Jule Niemeier vs. Xiyu Wang
  • Tim Van Rijthoven vs Fedrico Delbonis

Court 14

  • Adrian Mannarino vs. Max Purcell
  • John Millman vs. Miomir Kecmanovic (25)
  • Astra Sharma vs Tatjana Maria
  • Oceane Dodin against Jelena Ostapenko (12)



Jelena Ostapenko reached the Wimbledon semi-finals four years ago (AFP via Getty Images)


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Jelena Ostapenko reached the Wimbledon semi-finals four years ago (AFP via Getty Images)

Court 15

  • Nikoloz Basilashvili (22) against Lukas Rosol
  • Kaia Kanepi (31) vs. Diane Parry
  • Dusan Lajovic vs. Pablo Carreno Busta (16)
  • Shuai Zhang (33) vs. Misaki Doi

Court 16

  • Katerina Siniakova vs Maja Chwalinska
  • Thanasi Kokkinakis vs. Kamil Majchrzak
  • Tallon Griekspoor vs Fabio Fognini
  • Ekaterine Gorgodze vs Irina-Camelia Begu

Court 17

  • Francis Tiafoe (23) against Andrea Vavassori
  • Caroline Garcia vs. Yuriko Miyazaki
  • Magda Linette vs. Fernanda Contreras Gomez
  • David Goffin vs. Radu Albot

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